Kids Who Know Everything with Host Valencia Clay and Special Guest D. Watkins

Friday September 29, 6:00PM

@ Red Emma's

Huey P. Newton said, "The revolution has always been in the hands of the young. The young always inherit the revolution." Yet in 2017, we hear less and less from the voices that matter most! Kids Who Know Everything is a new show that gives a voice to the future leaders and change agents of our world. Join us as we discuss shoot our pilot episode at Red Emma's on September 29th at 6PM. The topic: Don't Save Us! The special guest: Bestselling Author, D. Watkins. The host Valencia D. Clay. The panelists: Teens from Baltimore! 

All are welcome, especially the youth!

More upcoming events

@ Red Emma's

We can bear almost anything when it is worked through collectively. Grief is generally thought of as something personal and insular, but when we publicly share loss and pain, we lessen the power of the forces that debilitate us, while at the same time building the humane social practices that alleviate suffering and improve quality of life for everyone. Addressing tragedies from Fukushima to Palestine, incarceration to eviction, AIDS crises to border crossings, and racism to rape, the intimate yet tenacious writing in this volume shows that mourning can pry open spaces of contestation and reconstruction, empathy and solidarity. With contributions from Claudia Rankine, Sarah Schulman, David Wojnarowicz, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, David Gilbert, and thirty-two others. Also includes a 32-page color insert featuring artists like Jet Chalk, Oree Originol, Melanie Cervantes and Jesus Barraza, and more.


@ Red Emma's

Today, automated systems control which neighborhoods get policed, which families attain needed resources, and who is investigated for fraud. While we all live under this new regime of data analytics, the most invasive and punitive systems are aimed at the poor. In Automating Inequality, Virginia Eubanks systematically investigates the impacts of data mining, policy algorithms, and predictive risk models on poor and working-class people in America. Join the author for a night of heart wrenching, eye opening, but ultimately inspiring stories of the "digital poorhouse" -- from a woman in Indiana whose public assistance benefits are automatically terminated as she lays dying to a family in Pennsylvania in daily fear of losing their daughter because they fit a certain statistical profile. “This book is downright scary,” says Naomi Klein, "but with its striking research and moving, indelible portraits ... you will emerge smarter and more empowered to demand justice.”

From the New York Times bestselling author of Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs, a radical new way of thinking about depression and anxiety.

What really causes depression and anxiety - and how can we really solve them? Award-winning journalist Johann Hari suffered from depression since he was a child and started taking anti-depressants when he was a teenager. He was told that his problems were caused by a chemical imbalance in his brain. As an adult, trained in the social sciences, he began to investigate whether this was true – and he learned that almost everything we have been told about depression and anxiety is wrong. 

Across the world, Hari found social scientists who were uncovering evidence that depression and anxiety are not caused by a chemical imbalance in our brains. In fact, they are largely caused by key problems with the way we live today. Hari´s journey took him from a mind-blowing series of experiments in Baltimore, to an Amish community in Indiana, to an uprising in Berlin. Once he had uncovered nine real causes of depression and anxiety, they led him to scientists who are discovering seven very different solutions – ones that work. 

@ Red Emma's

We need words and poetic, lyrical expression that will expose and combat the lack of respect for oppressed and marginalized peoples! So come join us for an open mic of justice, conscious thought, spirituality, fam, real life—whatever advances the village! In the tradition of Emma Goldman’s Mother Earth magazine, come drop some progressive “fiyah” on us, or contribute just with your presence and energy! By the way: it’s a non-erotic poetry, non-“love jones” type of venue, so we ask that you not go there. (And, almost needless to say, leave the misogyny, homophobia and other unnecessary ish outside!)

@ Red Emma's
In a special early-evening event, author & activist Nick Licata joins us to speak about how the organizing principles that are illustrated in his book Becoming A Citizen Activist can assist citizen activists in stopping Trumpism (the spread of white nationalism, voter suppression, sex discrimination and the corporatization of democratic institutions) through providing progressive alternatives to white and minority working families. He will be joined by Kevin Zeese and Margaret Flowers, co-directors of Popular Resistance, in leading a discussion on organizing strategies. Licata is a former 5-term Seattle City Council Member; founding board chair of Local Progress, A National Municipal Policy Network, and named by the Nation as Progressive Municipal Official of the Year in 2012.
@ Red Emma's

Today, organizations of all kinds are ruled by the belief that the path to success is quantifying human performance, publicizing the results, and dividing up the rewards based on the numbers. But in our zeal to instill the evaluation process with scientific rigor, we've gone from measuring performance to fixating on measuring itself. The result is a tyranny of metrics that threatens the quality of our lives and most important institutions. In this timely and powerful book, Jerry Muller uncovers the damage our obsession with metrics is causing--and shows how we can begin to fix the problem.

@ Red Emma's
The story of America’s "War on Drugs" usually begins with Richard Nixon or Ronald Reagan. In his new book, Containing Addiction, Matthew R. Pembleton argues that its origins instead lie in the years following World War II, when the Federal Bureau of Narcotics—the country’s first drug control agency, established in 1930—began to depict drug control as a paramilitary conflict and sent agents abroad to disrupt the flow of drugs to American shores. In a series of complicated twists and turns on a global stage, Pembelton explains how America applied a foreign policy solution to a domestic social crisis, demonstrating how consistently policymakers have assumed that security at home can only be achieved through hegemony abroad. The result is a drug war that persists into the present day. Don't miss this critical talk!

In ‘“You Can’t Fire the Bad Ones”: And 18 Other Myths about Teachers, Teachers Unions, and Public Education’, three distinguished educators, scholars, and activists flip the script on many enduring and popular myths about teachers, teachers' unions, and education that permeate our culture. By unpacking these myths, and underscoring the necessity of strong and vital public schools as a common good, the authors challenge readers--whether parents, community members, policymakers, union activists, or educators themselves--to rethink their assumptions.