Michael Loadenthal presents The Politics of Attack

Wednesday March 21, 7:30PM

@ Red Emma's

Postponed due to snow! Rescheduling for May, stay tuned!


This study is an exploration of insurrectionary anarchist praxis, with a particular focus on how the rhetoric, discourse, and theory is both informed and conveyed through communiques. It challenges the reader to consider the marginalized ideas put forth by those political actors that communicate through bombs, arson, and broken windows, who are rejected through the state’s construction of terrorism. When a police station is firebombed, the subsequent discussions focus more on the illegality of the act rather than the sociopolitical critique the actor put forth. What if we were to embrace the means through which the militant ‘organic intellectual’ acts, and consider the communique’s content, the way one would consider any political text? This inter-textual analysis is presented within a political and historical context, with the hopes of elevating the discussion of insurrectionary praxis beyond notions of terrorism and securitization and towards its application for intersectional challenges to structural violence and domination.

In the social war being waged by insurrectionary anarchists, small acts of violence are announced and contextualized through written communiques, which are posted online, translated, and circulated globally. This book offers the first contemporary history of these post-millennial, digitally-mediated, insurrectionary anarchist networks, and seeks to locate this tendency within anti-state struggles form the past. Through an examination of thousands of movement documents, this book presents the discourse offered by clandestine, urban guerrillas fighting capitalism, the state, and the omnipresent forces of violence and coercion.


Michael Loadenthal is Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology and Social Justice at Miami University of Oxford, Ohio and Executive Director of the Peace and Justice Studies Association.

More upcoming events

@ Red Emma's

Join us for our annual holiday card writing event plus the Certain Days 2019 Calendar launch party! We’ll be sending dozens of holiday cards and birthday cards to political prisoners in time for the end of the year – a time of year that can be particularly lonely for those on the inside. Please join us to send some love through the walls. 

The 2013 Lac-Mégantic crude oil train disaster killed 47 people and destroyed a entire Quebec town: this new book uncovers new details about what happened, how it happened, who was responsible, and why it can happen again.

Crude-by-rail traffic is an urgent issue at the intersection of climate change, workers rights, and public safety and it's been a big topic of debate in Baltimore for years. Earlier this year, the City Council passed a bill banning new crude oil terminals in the city, but crude oil trains continue to pose a danger to the city, particularly as we see the repeated failures of our infrastructure such as the most recent 26th St collapse

Co-sponsored by CCAN, Railroad Workers United, and Clean Water Action


Join us for a talk by Bernardo Vigil, worker-owner at Baltimore Bicycle Works, for a talk about his research into workplace democracy in Barcelona, exploring the strategies  small and mid-sized worker co-ops are using to build meaningful pathways toward self-management, participation, and cooperative leadership development.

Talk at 7pm, with a special co-op happy hour hosted by the Baltimore Roundtable for Economic Democracy—the nonextractive local loan fund run by worker co-ops, for worker co-ops—at 5PM.

@ Red Emma's

A special event with contributors:

Co-sponsored by the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS)

From well-known intellectuals such as Frederick Douglass and Nella Larsen to often-obscured thinkers such as Amina Baraka and Bernardo Ruiz Suárez, black theorists across the globe have engaged in sustained efforts to create insurgent and resilient forms of thought. New Perspectives on the Black Intellectual Tradition is a collection of twelve essays that explores these and other theorists and their contributions to diverse strains of political, social, and cultural thought. 

The book examines four central themes within the black intellectual tradition: black internationalism, religion and spirituality, racial politics and struggles for social justice, and black radicalism. The essays identify the emergence of black thought within multiple communities internationally, analyze how black thinkers shaped and were shaped by the historical moment in which they lived, interrogate the ways in which activists and intellectuals connected their theoretical frameworks across time and space, and assess how these strains of thought bolstered black consciousness and resistance worldwide. 

Defying traditional temporal and geographical boundaries, New Perspectives on the Black Intellectual Tradition illuminates the origins of and conduits for black ideas, redefines the relationship between black thought and social action, and challenges long-held assumptions about black perspectives on religion, race, and radicalism. The intellectuals profiled in the volume reshape and redefine the contours and boundaries of black thought, further illuminating the depth and diversity of the black intellectual tradition.