"I Got A Monster" with Baynard Woods and Brandon Soderberg, plus a panel of special guests!

Thursday September 23, 7:00PM

@ Red Emma's

Now newly in paperback, Brandon Soderberg and Baynard Woods' I Got A Monster tells the page-turning story of the most corrupt police squad in America—Baltimore's Gun Trace Task Force, eight members of which were indicted and pled or were found guilty of racketeering, robbery, extortion, overtime fraud, and selling drugs seized during police operations. But far from being just the horrifying saga of a few bad apples ruining lives while wearing a badge, Soderberg and Woods' book is an indictment of American policing and the culture of impunity that sustains it. As last summer's calls to "defund the police" in the wake of George Floyd's murder are being met today in Baltimore with increases to the police budget, and the legacy of the GTTF is being remembered by resurrecting the paramilitary tactics and gun-panic framing that enabled it in the first place, we're thrilled to revisit I Got A Monster with the authors and a panel of special guests.

Joining Soderberg and Woods will be:

Bilphena Yahwon, organizer / restorative practices practitioner
Lisa Snowden, Baltimore journalist

J. Brian Charles, Reporter for The Trace
Deborah Levi, Director of Special Litigation in the Office of the Public Defender



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This insightful, deeply personal history of early-2000s subcultures lovingly explores the difficulty of applying feminist values to real-life dilemmas, and embrace an evolving political and personal consciousness. Whitney traces the sometimes painful clash between her feminist values and everyday, adult realities — and anyone who has worked to integrate their political ideals into their daily life will resonate with the histories and analysis on these pages, such as engaging in anti-domestic violence advocacy while feeling trapped in an unhealthy relationship, envisioning a unified "girl utopia" while lacking racial consciousness, or espousing body positivity while feeling ambivalent towards one's own body. 


Cedric Robinson – political theorist, historian, and activist – was one of the greatest black radical thinkers of the twentieth century. In this powerful work, the first major book to tell his story, Joshua Myers shows how Robinson’s work interrogated the foundations of western political thought, modern capitalism, and changing meanings of race.

Tracing the course of Robinson’s journey from his early days as an agitator in the 1960s to his publication of such seminal works as Black MarxismMyers frames Robinson’s mission as aiming to understand and practice opposition to “the terms of order.” In so doing, Robinson excavated the Black Radical tradition as a form of resistance that imagined that life on wholly different terms was possible.

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