Eleanor Whitney presents "Riot Woman: Using Feminist Values to Destroy the Patriarchy" w/ Liz Flyntz and Rahne Alexander

Wednesday October 27, 7:00PM

@ Red Emma's

A celebratory but critical look at the Riot Grrrl movement

Growing up immersed in the feminist, DIY values of punk, Riot Grrrl, and zine culture of the 1990s and early 2000s gave Eleanor Whitney, like so many other young people who gravitate towards activism and musical subcultures, a sense of power, confidence, community, and social responsibility. As she grew into adulthood she struggled to stay true to those values, and with the gaps left by her punk rock education. 

This insightful, deeply personal history of early-2000s subcultures lovingly explores the difficulty of applying feminist values to real-life dilemmas, and embrace an evolving political and personal consciousness. Whitney traces the sometimes painful clash between her feminist values and everyday, adult realities — and anyone who has worked to integrate their political ideals into their daily life will resonate with the histories and analysis on these pages, such as engaging in anti-domestic violence advocacy while feeling trapped in an unhealthy relationship, envisioning a unified "girl utopia" while lacking racial consciousness, or espousing body positivity while feeling ambivalent towards one's own body. 


Eleanor C. Whitney is a feminist writer, musician, and editor living in Brooklyn. She has built community and content strategy for startups and arts organizations including Axiom, Managed by Q, Dev Bootcamp, Shapeways, and the Brooklyn Museum. Her first book, Grow, is a practical field guide for managing a creative business. 


Liz Flyntz is an artist, curator, and designer. 


She leads a team of designers to make digital products for businesses and institutions as Director of User Experience and Design at DOOR3, a technology consultancy in NYC.


She’s co-founder of two artist collaboratives: Ant Farm Antioch Art Building Creative Preservation Initiative (also known as the punk preservationists), and Epicurean Endocrinology, a project about hormones and food.  


Liz has written about and designed exhibitions regarding video art and documentary, participatory and collective art making, and other topics related to media art for publications including AfterimageIntercourse, and the Creators Project. She co-curated, wrote, and edited The Present Is the Form of All Life: The Time Capsules of Ant Farm and LST, a book about Ant Farm's time capsule works for Pioneer Works Press.

https://www.lizflyntz.net/



Rahne Alexander is an intermedia artist and writer from Baltimore, Maryland. A 2021 graduate of the Intermedia+Digital Art MFA at UMBC, her works in video, performance, music, and painting have been exhibited across the U.S. and around the world, including the Baltimore Museum of Art, Tephra Institute of Contemporary Art, and MIX NYC. She performs music as 50 Foot Woman and as the front woman of the rock band Santa Librada. Her writing has been anthologized in Love, You  (Urban Ivy, 2020), Resilience (Heartspark, 2017) and the Lambda Literary Award-winning anthology Take Me There: Trans and Genderqueer Erotica (Cleis, 2011). Her OutWrite-award-winning chapbook of collected essays Heretic to Housewife was published by Neon Hemlock in 2019. More info at  rahne.com



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@ Red Emma's

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