Mother Earth Poetry Vibe Featuring Kirwyn Sutherland

Saturday August 1, 7:30PM

@ Red Emma's

It's summer, and the issues in our society are hotter than the temperatures outside!  We need the Poetic Arts.  Join us for a poetry/spoken word open mic of justice, conscious thought, spirituality, fam, real life—whatever advances the village!  In the tradition of Emma Goldman’s Mother Earth magazine, come drop some progressive “fiyah” on us, or contribute just with your presence and energy!  By the way: it’s a non-erotic poetry, non-“love jones” type of venue, so we ask that you not go there.  (And, almost needless to say, leave the misogyny, homophobia and other unnecessary ish outside!) 

Challenging times call for challenging poetry—thus, it's time for Kirwyn Sutherland!  From the poet: 

“During my college years, I experienced instances of racism for the first time.  As the anger from these events built up, I began to question my purpose at school, in the workforce, and ultimately as an American citizen.  The search for an identity triggered an exhaustive study of African American literature.  I read everything I could get my hands on, being most impacted by authors such as Frantz Fanon, Ralph Ellison, W.E.B DuBois, and the speeches of Malcolm X.  In combination with these writings, viewing Def Poetry Jam showed me a way to release anger and shout out a new identity.  My first poems were no-holds barred rants tackling subjects from slavery to lynchings to dealing with micro-aggressions.  My goal through writing was to introduce black pain, suffering, and triumph in my own voice.

X: A Mixtape was a self-published chapbook of collected poems that was released on March 2013.  These poems reflected the process of self-discovery within the context of African American History.  All of the proceeds received from the sale of the chapbook went to develop the Delores Sutherland Book Scholarship, which provided a $500 to a college freshman for textbooks.  From X: A Mixtape, the poem “Template,” about “white flight”, was published in the Philadelphia literary magazine APIARY for their Summer 2013 issue.  As a result of this relationship, I procured feature performances at The Fuze Open Mic and Sounds in the Gallery Open Mic in Philadelphia, representing APIARY.   

My approach to writing has evolved into experimenting with traditional forms to create new forms that best convey the intention and meaning of the subject matter I choose.  The first product of this came in the form of a reworking of my chapbook.  X: A Mixtape Remastered was published through the Philadelphia based company, 2 Pens and Lint.  The content of the book included edits of some poems from the initial work as well as new poems.  I received great feedback from the poetry community including the book being used for instruction in a Temple University Creative Writing class.    

Currently, I am working on my next project which will be entitled Kid B: An Ecological Study. The book will study the effects of a crumbling urban ecology on the lives of young black men and women.   Additionally, I am the Youth Chairperson of The Collective Open Mic, working to bridge the gap between the youth and adult poetry scenes.  A collective where poets can come together, read, critique, share work and discuss issues was necessary for me to create.   In response to this need, The Mission Statement Poetry Collective was formed with Philadelphia poets Warren Longmire, Christopher K.P. Brown, Lauren Yates and Mydera Speak Me Free.  This collective will serve to provide a place for poets of color to grow artistically and affect the community at large through the art created as well as other programming.” 

kirwyn.sutherland@gmail.com 

www.kirwynsutherland.wordpress.com 

www.facebook.com/KSUTH84?fref=ts

Twitter @KirwynSutherlan 

Holdin’ it down for the evening is Analysis--poet & spoken word artist, organizer, minister, activist, educator, consultant… Y’all know what’s up!    www.facebook.com/analysisthepoet

Twitter @AnalysisThePoet 

MIC LIST OPENS AT 7:00pm!   

(Mature language and themes may be involved; not suggested for younger children.)   

The evening is brought to you by Red Emma’s Bookstore Coffeehouse, a worker-owned and collectively-operated restaurant, coffee roaster, bookstore, and community events space located in Baltimore's Station North neighborhood that is dedicated to putting principles of solidarity and sustainability into practice in a democratic workplace!  Here you’ll find delicious, transparently traded, organic coffee, espresso and tea, as well as a selection of vegan and vegetarian food. 

Get here early so you can check out the books and periodicals on a wide range of topics, with a focus on radical politics and culture. 

Plus, there’s free internet access!  

http://redemmas.org/  

https://www.facebook.com/redemmas   

Remember: PEACE, JUSTICE, POETRY!!   Will we see you there? 

More upcoming events

@ Red Emma's

In this lush compendium illustrated with full-color images, the author of The Burlesque Handbook chronicles the history of one of the world’s most beloved fashion patterns—leopard print—celebrating its beauty and place in couture, and the women who have dared to wear it.

In nature, the distinctive markings on big cats served as camouflage, helping them to blend into their surroundings when hunting prey. Unlike these magnificent predators, humans have donned this distinctive animal pattern to be noticed; leopard print demands an audience. Jo Weldon, an expert in the world of burlesque, reveals how this sexy, playful, decadent, and vibrant pattern once reserved for royalty came into vogue and became a staple of fashion.

With the revolution in technology and the rise of mass production in the early 1900s, textiles could be produced quickly and inexpensively, transforming every industry. Couture experienced a creative awakening: colors, prints, and patterns never seen before became ubiquitous. A greater freedom of choice in ready-to-wear clothing gave women the opportunity to express themselves in new styles. From its inception in textile, leopard print—long used as a symbol of a warrior’s power or a ruler’s wealth—became a sensation, adopted by daring trendsetters and members of the avant-garde, including film stars and celebrities such as Carole Lombard and Josephine Baker, who walked her pet Cheetah, Chiquita, on a diamond-encrusted leash. The desire for leopard print continues today as Nicki Minaj, Rihanna and other stars flaunt their feline-inspired spots on film and stage, the catwalk and the red carpet.

With a lively narrative, informative sidebars, and stunning images, Fierce is a must have collection for designers and fashionistas of all kinds.

In Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments, Saidiya Hartman examines the revolution of black intimate life that unfolded in Philadelphia and New York at the beginning of the twentieth century. Free love, common-law and transient marriages, serial partners, cohabitation outside of wedlock, queer relations, and single motherhood were among the sweeping changes that altered the character of everyday life and challenged traditional Victorian beliefs about courtship, love, and marriage. Hartman narrates the story of this radical social transformation against the grain of the prevailing century-old argument about the crisis of the black family.

In wrestling with the question of what a free life is, many young black women created forms of intimacy and kinship that were indifferent to the dictates of respectability and outside the bounds of law. They cleaved to and cast off lovers, exchanged sex to subsist, and revised the meaning of marriage. Longing and desire fueled their experiments in how to live. They refused to labor like slaves or to accept degrading conditions of work.

Beautifully written and deeply researched, Wayward Lives recreates the experience of young urban black women who desired an existence qualitatively different than the one that had been scripted for them—domestic service, second-class citizenship, and respectable poverty—and whose intimate revolution was apprehended as crime and pathology. For the first time, young black women are credited with shaping a cultural movement that transformed the urban landscape. Through a melding of history and literary imagination, Wayward Lives recovers their radical aspirations and insurgent desires.

@ Red Emma's

Join us for a presentation and discussion with radical climate sociologist and carbon geographer Daniel Aldana Cohen on the meaning of a Green New Deal—why it matters for Left strategy, and how urban social movements can organize towards it.

Many prominent and well-known figures greatly impacted the civil rights movement, but one of the most influential and unsung leaders of that period was Gloria Richardson. As the leader of the Cambridge Nonviolent Action Committee (CNAC), a multifaceted liberation campaign formed to target segregation and racial inequality in Cambridge, Maryland, Richardson advocated for economic justice and tactics beyond nonviolent demonstrations. Her philosophies and strategies—including her belief that black people had a right to self–defense—were adopted, often without credit, by a number of civil rights and black power leaders and activists.

The Struggle Is Eternal: Gloria Richardson and Black Liberation explores the largely forgotten but deeply significant life of this central figure and her determination to improve the lives of black people. Using a wide range of source materials, including interviews with Richardson and her personal papers, as well as interviews with dozens of her friends, relatives, and civil rights colleagues, Joseph R. Fitzgerald presents an all-encompassing narrative. From Richardson’s childhood in Baltimore, when her parents taught her the importance of racial pride, through the next eight decades, Fitzgerald relates a detailed and compelling story of her life. He reveals how Richardson’s human rights activism extended far beyond Cambridge and how her leadership style and vision for liberation were embraced by the younger activists of the black power movement, who would carry the struggle on throughout the late 1960s and into the 1970s.

Joining author Joseph R. Fitzgerald will be Dion Banks & Kisha Petticolas of the Eastern Shore Network for Change, to situate Gloria Richardson's life and work within the continuing struggle for racial equity and justice on Maryland's Eastern Shore.




As the largest employer of one of the world’s leading economic and geo-political superpowers, the history of the federal government’s workforce is a rich and essential tool for understanding how the “Great Experiment” truly works. The literal face of federal policy, federal employees enjoy a history as rich as the country itself, while reflecting the country’s evolution towards true democracy within a public space. Nowhere is this progression towards democracy more apparent than with its internal race relations. While World War II was a boon to black workers, little is known about the nuanced, ongoing struggles for dignity and respect that black workers endured while working these “good, government jobs.” American Dream Deferred challenges postwar narratives of government largess for African Americans by illuminating the neglected stories of these unknown black workers.

@ Red Emma's

Join local writer Antoine “A. J.” Hayes as he reads from his new book, Gratitude: Baltimore. In Gratitude: Baltimore, Hayes shows his appreciation for Baltimore’s culture – including arabbers, hack drivers and more – using photographs, poems and essays. Gratitude: Baltimore is a love letter to city. Following the reading will be a zine making workshop where participants will create their own gratitude book. More info: www.ajhayes.com.

@ Red Emma's

Celebrating five years of freedom for Marshall "Eddie" Conway after over four decades behind bars as a political prisoner!

@ Red Emma's

“One day perhaps we will write, think, and act en masse; entire communes will undertake a work.” —Novalis

In the Name of the People is an analysis and reflection on the global populist surge, written from the local forms it takes in the places we inhabit: the United States, Catalonia, France, Italy, Japan, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, Quebec, Russia, and Ukraine. The upheaval and polarizations caused by populist policies around the world indicates above all the urgency to develop a series of planetary revolutionary interpretations, and to make the necessary connections in order to understand and act in the world.

The ghost of the People has returned to the world stage, claiming to be the only force capable of correcting or taking charge of the excesses of the time. The relationship between the collapse of certain orders, the multiplication of civil wars, and the incessant appeal to the People is clear: as the liberal mode of governance experiences a global legitimation crisis, different forms of right and left populism gain strength within the fractures of ever expanding ruins.

Populism has now become familiar as a global phenomenon: from the eruptions of the far right in the West to the populist capture of the movement of the squares—Syriza in Greece, Podemos in Spain, the Five Star Movement in Italy, or Our Revolution in the United States—to the electoral victories of Rodrigo Duterte, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Narendra Modi, Benjamin Netanyahu, Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, and Brexit, all alongside large populist gains in every European country. While disparate in many ways, these dynamics all share an appeal to combat the rule and sensibility of the elites, with the help of a figure that can channel the affective energies of discontent through operations of identification and exclusion.

And yet, from the Narodniki to the Black Panthers and Zapatistas, to the emancipatory political movements which expressed themselves as the authentic people—Nuit Debout, the 99%, the indignados—history reminds us of revolutionary populisms. 

How do we distinguish the new from the old? What are their limits and potentials? What is the nature of the affective flows that characterize their relations? How do we address the indeterminacy inherent in mass movements and mobilizations, as well as their confusions, fears, and hesitancies?

Friends: we pose the question of populism to you because it is the question our time poses to us. 


A first-person history of nonviolent resistance in the U.S., from pre-Revolutionary America to the Trump years.

"This book fights fascism. This books offers hope. We The Resistance is essential reading for those who wish to understand how popular movements built around nonviolence have changed the world and why they retain the power to do so again."—Jonathan Eig, author of Ali: A Life

"This comprehensive documentary history of non-violent resisters and resistance movements is an inspiring antidote to any movement fatigue or pessimism about the value of protest. It tells us we can learn from the past as we confront the present and hope to shape the future. Read, enjoy and take courage knowing you are never alone in trying to create a more just world. Persevere and persist and win, but know that even losing is worth the fight and teaches lessons for later struggles."—Mary Frances Berry, author of History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times

"We the Resistance illustrates the deeply rooted, dynamic, and multicultural history of nonviolent resistance and progressive activism in North America and the United States. With a truly comprehensive collection of primary sources, it becomes clear that dissent has always been a central feature of American political culture and that periods of quiescence and consensus are aberrant rather than the norm. Indeed, the depth and breadth of resistant and discordant voices in this collection is simply outstanding."—Leilah Danielson, author of American Gandhi: A.J. Muste and the History of American Radicalism in the Twentieth Century 

While historical accounts of the United States typically focus on the nation's military past, a rich and vibrant counter narrative remains basically unknown to most Americans. This alternate history of the formation of our nation—and its character—is one in which courageous individuals and movements have wielded the tools of nonviolence to resist unjust, unfair, and immoral policies and practices.

We the Resistance gives curious citizens and current resisters unfiltered access to the hearts and minds of their activist predecessors. Beginning with the pre-Revolutionary War era and continuing through to the present day, readers will encounter the voices of protestors sharing instructive stories about their methods (from sit-ins to tree sitting) and opponents (from Puritans to Wall Street bankers), as well as inspirational stories about their failures (from slave petitions to the fight for the ERA), and successes (from enfranchisement for women to today's reform of police practices). Instruction and inspiration run throughout this captivating reader, generously illustrated with historic graphics and photographs of nonviolent protests throughout U.S. history.

@ Red Emma's

“Stewarding our own land, growing our own food, educating our own youth, participating in our own healthcare and justice systems—this is the source of real power and dignity.”

Some of our most cherished sustainable farming practices have roots in African wisdom. Yet, discrimination and violence against African-American farmers has led to their decline from 14 percent of all growers in 1920 to less than 2 percent today, with a corresponding loss of over 14 million acres of land.  Further, Black communities suffer disproportionately from illnesses related to lack of access to fresh food and healthy natural ecosystems. Soul Fire Farm, cofounded by author, activist, and farmer Leah Penniman, is committed to ending racism and injustice in our food system. Through innovative programs such as the Black-Latinx Farmers Immersion, a sliding-scale farmshare CSA, and Youth Food Justice leadership training, Penniman is part of a global network of farmers working to increase farmland stewardship by people of color, restore Afro-indigenous farming practices, and end food apartheid.  

And now, with Farming While Black, Penniman extends that work by offering the first comprehensive manual for African-heritage people ready to reclaim their rightful place of dignified agency in the food system. This one-of-a-kind guide provides readers with a concise “how-to” for all aspects of small-scale farming.


This collection of essays challenges reactionary nationalism by making the positive case for the benefits of free movement for countries on both ends of the exchange. Open Borders counters the knee-jerk reaction to build walls and close borders by arguing that there is not a moral, legal, philosophical, or economic case for limiting the movement of human beings at borders. The volume brings together essays by theorists in anthropology, geography, international relations, and other fields who argue for open borders with writings by activists who are working to make safe passage a reality on the ground. It puts forward a clear, concise, and convincing case for a world without movement restrictions at borders.


@ Red Emma's

A special event with contributors:

Co-sponsored by the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS)

From well-known intellectuals such as Frederick Douglass and Nella Larsen to often-obscured thinkers such as Amina Baraka and Bernardo Ruiz Suárez, black theorists across the globe have engaged in sustained efforts to create insurgent and resilient forms of thought. New Perspectives on the Black Intellectual Tradition is a collection of twelve essays that explores these and other theorists and their contributions to diverse strains of political, social, and cultural thought. 

The book examines four central themes within the black intellectual tradition: black internationalism, religion and spirituality, racial politics and struggles for social justice, and black radicalism. The essays identify the emergence of black thought within multiple communities internationally, analyze how black thinkers shaped and were shaped by the historical moment in which they lived, interrogate the ways in which activists and intellectuals connected their theoretical frameworks across time and space, and assess how these strains of thought bolstered black consciousness and resistance worldwide. 

Defying traditional temporal and geographical boundaries, New Perspectives on the Black Intellectual Tradition illuminates the origins of and conduits for black ideas, redefines the relationship between black thought and social action, and challenges long-held assumptions about black perspectives on religion, race, and radicalism. The intellectuals profiled in the volume reshape and redefine the contours and boundaries of black thought, further illuminating the depth and diversity of the black intellectual tradition.

@ Red Emma's

In Occult Features of Anarchism, Erica Lagalisse sets straight the history of the Left, illustrating the actual relationship between modern revolutionism, occult philosophy, and the clandestine fraternity: Questions of class respectability may lead Leftists to ignore “conspiracy theory”, yet in doing so neo-fascist theories of history gain ground.  Inspired by research within today’s anarchist movements, Lagalisse's latest work also serves to challenge contemporary anarchist “atheism”, which poses practical challenges for coalition politics in the 21st century.  Finally, by studying the history of anarchism, Lagalisse also shows how the development of Leftist theory and practice within clandestine masculine “public” spheres continues to inform 21st century anarchist understandings of the ‘political’, in which men’s oppression by the state becomes the prototype for power in general.