Why the Sun Rises: The Faces and Stories of Women in Education

Thursday August 4, 7:30PM

@ Red Emma's

Educators share an affinity with the sun, mirroring its ability and power to warm, nurture, and guide the masses.  The book Why The SUN Rises shares the inspiration, sweat, and tears of professionals in education. This collection of essays tells 29 unique stories about a profession that is regarded as the hardest in the world.  

Join us in bringing together a community passionate about teaching and learning, in all of its unique forms. This event will showcase the diverse voices from Why The SUN Rises, followed by a panel and audience discussion to unfold some of the topics found in our author’s stories. Amongst those topics you will hear, and be invited to participate in, discussions around how we can be part of changing an educational landscape that is more restrictive than it is freeing, navigating school as women of color, and how our own personal narratives can both free and heal us and our students.

Panel Moderator: Meredith Chase-Mitchell has worked in the nonprofit sector under the education umbrella for over fifteen years in the capacity of director of programs, charter school advocate, and recruiter. She is currently a middle school special education language arts teacher Arlington, Virginia, and has also written a children's book entitled “Mommy and Me” highlighting positive relationships between a mother and her daughter. In 2014, Meredith founded Classroom Culture, an education based startup that provides a platform for professionals in education to collaborate and lead.

Panelists:

Jenna Shaw is the Director of Technology and Creativity at Liberty Elementary School in Baltimore City, Maryland. Jenna is also the Founder and Executive Director of The Whole Teacher, a nonprofit that embeds mental health and wellness services in schools for Baltimore City educators.

Tianna Adams is a Los Angeles native and graduate of Howard University. She has over ten years experience as an educator and has worked at a variety of private and public schools. She is currently an INstructional Coach for Prince George's Public Schools.

Dr. Angela Chambers

Nicole E. Smith currently resides and works in DC as the Senior Program Officer, School Programs for the College Success Foundation DC and is the President and CEO of Smith Education Consulting, where she assists and supports families through the entire college selection and acceptance process.

Nakia Dow is an alum of Virginia Tech and has been in education for over ten years in various education settings. She has taught middle school English, special education, and served as a special education coordinator.

More upcoming events

How community-centered, peer-to-peer, youth knowledge exchanges are evolving into a strong economic and political foundation on which to build radical public education.

Following in the rich traditions in African American cooperative economic and educational thought, teacher-organizer Jay Gillen describes the Baltimore Algebra Project (BAP) as a youth-run cooperative enterprise in which young people direct their peers’ and their own learning for a wage. BAP and similar enterprises are creating an educational network of empowered, employed students.

Gillen argues that this is a proactive political, economic, and educational structure that builds relationships among and between students and their communities. It’s a structure that meets communal needs—material and social, economic and political—both now and in the future. Through the story of the Baltimore Algebra Project, readers will learn why youth employment is a priority, how to develop democratic norms and cultures, how to foster positive community roles for 20–30 year-olds, and how to implement educational accountability from below.

@ Red Emma's

An evening to feel and discuss the power of poetry!


“Dynamic duo” is a term usually reserved for the likes of comic book heroes, but if it were to apply to Spoken Word poetry, Writing4mylife would be it! Comprised of super poets Archie the Messenger and Lyrical the Lyricist, Writing4MyLife redefines the art of storytelling through spoken word, comedy, and improvisation. They have performed together for 15 years and in that time have created a two-man spoken word play that toured to six cities and an ongoing showcase, “Awesome,” which features the nation’s best spoken word artists. Between them they have published four books.


Just Enough For The City, the latest book from Lyrical the Lyricist, is an art experience of handwritten poetry that paints the American city reality into a dazzling mural of 16 poems. The collection is an ode to the city.


Archie the Messenger’s Crown of Thorns is a vivid look at life from a young prince out of Buffalo, NY traveling to Baltimore. Beautiful imagery, power, and passion come to life throughout the pages.


Come see, hear and feel how Writing 4 My Life brings poetry to life in an experience like none other! Even long-time fans will welcome this opportunity to hear Archie and Lyrical not only perform their poetry but discuss and answer questions about it as well.

What does it mean to lose your roots—within your culture, within your family—and what happens when you find them?

Nicole Chung was born severely premature in the United States, placed for adoption by her Korean parents, and raised by a white family in a sheltered Oregon town. From childhood, she heard the story of her adoption as a comforting, prepackaged myth. She believed that her biological parents had made the ultimate sacrifice in the hope of giving her a better life, that forever feeling slightly out of place was her fate as a transracial adoptee. But as Nicole grew up—facing prejudice her adoptive family couldn’t see, finding her identity as an Asian American and as a writer, becoming ever more curious about where she came from—she wondered if the story she’d been told was the whole truth.

With the same warmth, candor, and startling insight that has made her a beloved voice, Chung tells of her search for the people who gave her up, which coincided with the birth of her own child. All You Can Ever Know is a profound, moving chronicle of surprising connections and the repercussions of unearthing painful family secrets—vital reading for anyone who has ever struggled to figure out where they belong.

“This book moved me to my very core. As in all her writing, Nicole Chung speaks eloquently and honestly about her own personal story, then widens her aperture to illuminate all of us. All You Can Ever Know is full of insights on race, motherhood, and family of all kinds, but what sets it apart is the compassion Chung brings to every facet of her search for identity and every person portrayed in these pages. This book should be required reading for anyone who has ever had, wanted, or found a family―which is to say, everyone.” ―Celeste Ng, author of Little Fires Everywhere

"Chung’s memoir is more than a thoughtful consideration of race and heritage in America. It is the story of sisters finding each other, overcoming bureaucracy, abuse, separation, and time." ―The New Yorker



@ Red Emma's

N.B. This event will start early at 6:30 and take place upstairs in the restaurant to leave plenty of room for game play!

The adverb “avidly” is defined as “with great interest and enthusiasm.” Avidly―the online magazine founded in 2012 by Sarah Blackwood & Sarah Mesle and supported by the Los Angeles Review of Books―specializes in short-form critical essays devoted to the intersection of expertise and passion. Now, I hope you and your readers will embrace Avidly Reads, an exciting new series of books that are part memoir, part cultural criticism, each bringing to life the author’s emotional relationship to a cultural artifact or experience. Indeed, the editors and authors in the Avidly Reads series invite readers to explore the surprising pleasures and obstacles encountered in our everyday life.

In Board Games, writer and critic Eric Thurm digs deep into his own experience as a board game enthusiast to explore the emotional and social rules that games create and reveal, telling a series of stories about a pastime that is also about relationships. From the outdated gender roles in Life and Mystery Date to the cutthroat, capitalist priorities of Monopoly and its socialist counterpart, Class Struggle, Thurm thinks through his ongoing rivalries with his siblings and ponders the ways games both upset and enforce hierarchies and relationships―from the familial to the geopolitical. Like sitting down at the table for family game night, Board Games is an engaging book of twists and turns, trivia, and nostalgia.

Unlike our "normal" book events, this event is going to be highly participatory, with replicas of a hundred+ years of ideological board games available to play and then discuss with the author!

Victorine Quille Adams was a Baltimore native and the first African American woman elected to the city council. Born in 1912, she lived through stringent segregation, racial violence and economic turbulence. Educated at Morgan State and Coppin State Universities, she took to the classroom and enriched the lives of her students. In 1946, she founded the Colored Women's Democratic Campaign Committee to educate African American women about the vote and the power of the ballot box. In concert with fellow educators Mary McLeod Bethune, Kate Sheppard and Dr. Delores Hunt, she persisted in educating and empowering voters throughout her life. Similar to the CWDCC, she elevated the position and power of women in the civic affairs of Baltimore. Author Ida E. Jones reveals the story of this civic leader and her crusade for equity for all people in Baltimore.

@ Red Emma's

N.B. This event will start early at 6PM to better accommodate kids and parents!

Innosanto Nagara, the author and illustrator behind A is For Activist, is coming to Red Emma's to present his latest project, M is For Movement, a middle grade (8-12) book about how social transformation from below happens, told through the eyes of a young protagonist.

“This imaginative and highly appealing children’s story, enlivened with brilliant artwork, focuses mainly on the shattering yet inspiring history of modern Indonesia, but has much broader resonance and outreach. Its lucid and powerful message is that ordinary people, with courage and dedication, can help create popular movements that change the world, even under the most onerous conditions. Lessons that could not be more pertinent for all of us today.” —Noam Chomsky


The adverb “avidly” is defined as “with great interest and enthusiasm.” Avidly―the online magazine founded in 2012 by Sarah Blackwood & Sarah Mesle and supported by the Los Angeles Review of Books―specializes in short-form critical essays devoted to the intersection of expertise and passion. Now, I hope you and your readers will embrace Avidly Reads, an exciting new series of books that are part memoir, part cultural criticism, each bringing to life the author’s emotional relationship to a cultural artifact or experience. Indeed, the editors and authors in the Avidly Reads series invite readers to explore the surprising pleasures and obstacles encountered in our everyday life.

As an avowed “theory head,” Jordan Alexander Stein confronts a contradiction: that the abstract, and often frustrating rigors of theory also produced a sense of pride and identity for him and his friends: an idea of how to be and a way to live. Although Stein explains what theory is, this is not an introduction or a how-to, but rather Stein’s insights organized around five ways that theory makes one feel―silly, stupid, sexy, seething and stuck. In Theory, Stein travels back to the late nineties to tell a story of coming of age at a particular moment and to measure how that moment lives on and shapes him today.

A haunting, evocative history of British Empire, told through one woman’s family story.

“Where are you from?” was the question hounding Hazel Carby as a girl in post-war London. One of the so-called brown babies of the Windrush generation, born to a Jamaican father and Welsh mother, Carby’s place in her home, her neighbourhood, and her country of birth was always in doubt.

Emerging from this setting, Carby untangles the threads connecting members of her family in a web woven by the British Empire across the Atlantic. We meet Carby’s working-class grandmother Beatrice, a seamstress challenged by poverty and disease. In England, she was thrilled by the cosmopolitan fantasies of empire, by cities built with slave-trade profits, and by street peddlers selling fashionable Jamaican delicacies. In Jamaica, we follow the lives of both the “white Carbys” and the “black Carbys,” including Mary Ivey, a free woman of colour, whose children are fathered by Lilly Carby, a British soldier who arrived in Jamaica in 1789 to be absorbed into the plantation aristocracy. And we discover the hidden stories of Bridget and Nancy, two women owned by Lilly who survived the Middle Passage from Africa to the Caribbean.

Moving between Jamaican plantations, the hills of Devon, the port cities of Bristol, Cardiff, and Kingston, and the working-class estates of South London, Carby’s family story is at once an intimate personal history and a sweeping summation of the violent entanglement of two islands. In charting British empire’s interweaving of capital and bodies, public language and private feeling, Carby will find herself reckoning with what she can tell, what she can remember, and what she can bear to know.

A powerful critique of how manipulation of media gives rise to disinformation, intolerance, and divisiveness, and how we can fight back.

The role of news media in a free society is to investigate, inform, and provide a crucial check on political power. But does it?

It's no secret that the goal of corporate-owned media is to increase the profits of the few, not to empower the many. As a result, people are increasingly immersed in an information system structured to reinforce their social biases and market to their buying preferences. Journalism's essential role has been drastically compromised, and Donald Trump's repeated claims of "fake news" and framing of the media as an "enemy of the people" have made a bad scenario worse.

Written in the spirit of resistance and hope, United States of Distraction offers a clear, concise appraisal of our current situation, and presents readers with action items for how to improve it.

Dr. Nolan Higdon is professor of History and Communication at California State University, East Bay. His academic work primarily focuses on news media, propaganda, critical media literacy, and social justice pedagogies. He has been a guest commentator for news media outlets such as The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, CBS, NBC, ABC, and Fox. He is a board member for the Media Freedom Foundation, frequent contributor to Project Censored's annual Censored books series, a co-founder of the Global Critical Media Literacy Project, a program advisor for Sacred Heart University Media Literacy and Digital Culture Graduate Program, a steering committee member for the Union for Democratic Communications, and co-host of the Project Censored radio show.

Jaisal Noor is a host, producer, and reporter for The Real News Network. With his expertise in education policy and systemic inequity, he focuses on Baltimore, Maryland. He mainly grew up in the Baltimore area and studied modern history at the University of Maryland, College Park. Before joining TRNN, he contributed print, radio, and TV reports to Free Speech Radio NewsDemocracy Now! and The Indypendent.