Red Emma's Mother Earth Poetry Vibe--featuring Rienne Jahnai!

Saturday November 4, 6:30PM

@ Red Emma's

The seasonal expression goes, “Spring forward; fall back.” But we know what time it is in this country, so we're going to fall forward into justice and resistance—and poetry will help shore us up to do so! Join us for an open mic of justice, conscious thought, spirituality, fam, real life—whatever advances the village! In the tradition of Emma Goldman’s Mother Earth magazine, come drop some progressive “fiyah” on us, or contribute just with your presence and energy!

By way of Philadelphia, Rienne “Ryan” Jahnai is a Baltimore County middle school teacher, poet, mentor, and proud advocate for all LGBTQ+ people of color. She is the 2015 DC Black Pride Slam Champion, and in 2016 she created "OUTspoken," an LGBTQ+ open mic, to provide a platform for local artists, businesses, organizations, and allies that accentuate the community's diversity through art. Though introverted, Rienne is a fiery eruption of pure passion on stage! She has dedicated her efforts to creating spaces and opportunities for both youth and LGBTQ+ POC. She is also a writing instructor and conducts youth workshops in both Baltimore and Philadelphia.

MIC LIST OPENS AT 6:00pm!


For more info or bookings, you can send Rienne Jahnai an email at riennejahnai@gmail.com.

Social Media: IG--@only1rienne or @outspoken.openmic FB--Rienne Jahnai


Holdin’ it down for the evening is Analysis—poet/spoken word artist, educator, minister, organizer, activist, consultant, bookseller… Y’all know what’s up!

www.facebook.com/analysisthepoet

Twitter @analysisthepoet

IG: analysisthepoet


By the way: it’s a non-erotic poetry, non-“love jones” type of venue, so we ask that you not go there. And, almost needless to say, leave the misogyny, homophobia and other unnecessary ish outside! However, mature language and themes may be involved; not suggested for younger children.


The evening is brought to you by Red Emma’s Bookstore Coffeehouse, a worker-owned and collectively-operated restaurant, coffee roaster, bookstore, and community events space located in Baltimore's Station North neighborhood that is dedicated to putting principles of solidarity and sustainability into practice in a democratic workplace! Here you’ll find delicious, transparently traded, organic coffee, espresso and tea, as well as a selection of vegan and vegetarian food. Get here early so you can check out the books and periodicals on a wide range of topics, with a focus on radical politics and culture. Plus, there’s free internet access!


Remember: PEACE, JUSTICE, POETRY!! Will we see you there? :)

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