events at red emma's

Description: This talk is concerned with processes of racial banishment, which I conceptualize as state-instituted violence against racialized bodies and communities.  Breaking with narratives of gentrification, neoliberalization, and poverty deconcentration, I foreground long histories of dispossession and disposability that are being remade in the contemporary metropolis.  Drawing on urban transformations currently underway in Los Angeles, I examine how technologies of urban planning such as municipal ordinances serve as the public means of criminalization, eviction, relocation, and exclusion. Holding in simultaneous view black geographies and postcolonial theory, I am concerned with how we can remake critical urban theory to take full account of racial capitalism.  Such frameworks also make possible the study of imaginations and practices that are challenging racial banishment and crafting movements committed to freedom cast as revolutionary humanism. Thinking from postcolonial Los Angeles, I share examples of such struggles and their insistence on dismantling the color-lines of the 21st century American city. 


@ Red Emma's

This November, let's fall into something new—specifically, the exciting brand new location of Red Emma's! We're back in Mt. Vernon, right in the heart of the Cultural Center, and ready to bring the poetic excellence to you as we always do. Join us for an open mic of justice, conscious thought, spirituality, fam, real life—whatever advances the village! In the tradition of Emma Goldman’s “Mother Earth” magazine, come drop some rad “fiyah” on us, or contribute just with your presence and energy! [By the way: it’s a non-erotic venue, so rather than a love/erotica evening, we focus this night on justice and other matters of life. And, almost needless to say, leave the misogyny, homophobia and other unnecessary ish outside!]

@ Red Emma's

“Why am I in this country now? Should I move elsewhere? Do I want to raise my kids in this country, where hate is so visible and rampant? I’ve been in this fight for decades, but even I struggle. Deep down, though, I know we need to stay the course and continue the fight.” —Marwan Kreidie, after a pig’s head was thrown at the Al-Aqsa Islamic Society Mosque in Philadelphia

In American Hate: Survivors Speak Out, Arjun Singh Sethi, a community activist and civil rights lawyer, chronicles the stories of individuals affected by hate. In a series of powerful, unfiltered testimonials, survivors tell their stories in their own words and describe how the bigoted rhetoric and policies of the Trump administration have intensified bullying, discrimination, and even violence toward them and their communities.


@ Red Emma's
@ Red Emma's

The author of the essential history of real estate segregation in Baltimore, Not in My Neighborhood, is back with a brand new book!

Johns Hopkins destroyed his private papers so thoroughly that no credible biography exists of the Baltimore Quaker titan. One of America’s richest men and the largest single shareholder of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Hopkins was also one of the city’s defining developers. In The Ghosts of Johns Hopkins, Antero Pietila weaves together a biography of the man with a portrait of how the institutions he founded have shaped the racial legacy of an industrial city from its heyday to its decline and revitalization. From the destruction of neighborhoods to make way for the mercantile buildings that dominated Baltimore’s downtown through much of the 19th century to the role that the president of Johns Hopkins University played in government sponsored “Negro Removal” that unleashed the migration patterns that created Baltimore’s existing racial patchwork, Pietila tells the story of how one man’s wealth shaped and reshaped the life of a city long after his lifetime.