Feminism Is for Everybody: Passionate Politics

bell hooks

Paperback

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An excellent primer for understanding feminist politics in the various forms it can be expressed, marriage, parenting, etc.

In this engaging and provocative volume, bell hooks introduces a popular theory of feminism rooted in common sense and the wisdom of experience. Hers is a vision of a beloved community that appeals to all those committed to equality, mutual respect, and justice. hooks applies her critical analysis to the most contentious and challenging issues facing feminists today, including reproductive rights, violence, race, class, and work. With her customary insight and unsparing honesty, hooks calls for a feminism free from divisive barriers but rich with rigorous debate. In language both eye-opening and optimistic, hooks encourages us to demand alternatives to patriarchal, racist, and homophobic culture, and to imagine a different future.

hooks speaks to all those in search of true liberation, asking readers to take look at feminism in a new light, to see that it touches all lives. Issuing an invitation to participate fully in feminist movement and to benefit fully from it, hooks shows that feminism—far from being an outdated concept or one limited to an intellectual elite--is indeed for everybody.

ISBN 9781138821620
List price $25.95
Publisher Routledge
Year of publication 2014
Other editions:
Medium_9781138821620


The Will to Change a Review by CL@Re

March 24, 2014

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There are seldom books you come across that change your perspective. Sifting through lots of reading material you may every once in a while happen upon a gem of a book that alters your perspective in a seemingly permanent and life changing way. For me, this book found it’s way on the list of books that have changed my outlook in particular on the effects of patriarchy on men. After reading Feminism is for Everybody by the same author I was left with a general framework and historical context on the subject but genuinely missed how this concept could relate to my role as a self identifying “Man”.

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