events at red emma's

@ Red Emma's
From one of the most prominent voices on the American Left, a galvanizing argument for why we need socialism in the United States today

Cosponsored by Baltimore DSA!

The success of Bernie Sanders’s 2016 presidential campaign revived a political idea many had thought dead. But what, exactly, is socialism? And what would a socialist system in America look like?

In The Socialist Manifesto, Bhaskar Sunkara explores socialism’s history since the mid-1800s and presents a realistic vision for its future. The editor of Jacobinmagazine, Sunkara shows that socialism, though often seen primarily as an economic system, in fact offers the means to fight all forms of oppression, including racism and sexism. The ultimate goal is not Soviet-style planning, but to win rights to healthcare, education, and housing, and to create new democratic institutions in workplaces and communities. A primer on socialism for the 21st century, this is a book for anyone seeking an end to the vast inequities of our age.

@ Red Emma's

Spring! It’s a time of hope, renewal and blooming—but not everything is coming up roses in our world. We need poetry to help weed out the evil and ignorance! Join us for an open mic of justice, conscious thought, spirituality, fam, real life—whatever advances the village! In the tradition of Emma Goldman’s “Mother Earth” magazine, come drop some rad “fiyah” on us, or contribute just with your presence and energy. Our theme is “Peace, Justice, Poetry!” By the way: it’s a non-erotic venue, so rather than a love & erotica evening, we focus this night on justice and other matters of life. And, almost needless to say, leave the misogyny, homophobia and other unnecessary ish outside!


A poetic firestorm is overtaking us from Charlotte, North Carolina! Breeze "ILifeThis" The Poet—author, poet, battle rapper, host, workshop facilitator and mentor—is a Richmond, Virginia native and dedicated father of three who began writing poetry in high school and began performing professionally in 2010. While having many accomplishments in his short time as a professional poet, from slam championships to television show appearances, his ultimate goal is to teach his kids how to find their voices and never be silent, how to believe in their dreams and adopt the understanding that, while your gifts will make room for you, faith without works is dead and blessed are those who work diligently towards multiplying their gifts. He also desires to reach the next generations in hopes of helping them find themselves through this gift, as he has!


Breeze, the author of Serenity Song: Whole Hymns For Broken Peace and Amerikkkan History X-The Miseducation of... /The Praise Dance of a Sinner, lives out the idea of "Love Any Way"—a belief that love is the key ingredient needed to be relevant in this craft. Love enough to want to listen, learn, inform, inspire, enlighten and grow. Love also motivates one to always be honest in everything they do. “I was once told, ‘you don't win slams, get applause or praise and accolades because you're the greatest writer or performer, but because people believe you.’" That idea, above everything else, is the epitome of Breeze "ILifeThis" The Poet!

#ILifeThis #LoveAnyway


Accomplishments:

-Author of Serenity Song: Whole Hymns for Broken Peace

-Performed on the historic Apollo Theater stage

-Performed for Jill Scott at the Radio City Music Hall in NY as the winner of the prestigious Verses and Flow Writing Competition

-Opened up for Angie Stone

-National Television appearance as a featured poet on Lexus presents TV1 Verses and Flow (season 4)

-2015 Writers Den Grand Slam (Richmond) Champion

-Coached the 2016 Writing Lions (Richmond) to 6th place in the regional competition (Southern Fried Poetry Slam)

-5x consecutive King of the South Regional Poetry Slam champion (2011-2016)

-Took 2nd place at group piece finals with the 2017 Slam Charlotte Poetry Slam team at Nationals

-Creator of Life Line Poetry, an organization that strives for the growth of young poets

- 2018 IWPS for Bull City Slam

https://www.facebook.com/brzthepoet/


Holdin’ it down for the evening is Analysis—poet/spoken word artist, bookseller, educator, minister, justice & human rights theoretician… Y’all know what’s up!

www.artistEcard.com/analysisthepoet

www.facebook.com/analysisthepoet

Twitter and Instagram: @analysisthepoet


The MIC LIST will open at 5:30PM. [You must be present to sign up; no call-ins.]


FREE ADMISSION! [We will take a collection to support the feature.]


(Mature language and themes may be involved; not suggested for younger children.)


Remember: PEACE, JUSTICE, POETRY!! Will we see you there? :)


Academic freedom—crucial to the health of American higher education—is threatened on many fronts. In The Future of Academic Freedom, a leading scholar equips us to defend academic freedom by illuminating its meaning, the challenges it faces, and its relation to freedom of expression.

In the wake of the 2016 election, challenges to academic freedom have intensified, higher education has become a target of attacks by conservatives, and issues of free speech on campus have grown increasingly controversial. In this book, Henry Reichman cuts through much of the rhetoric to issue a clarion call on behalf of academic freedom as it has been defined and defended by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) for over a hundred years. Along the way, he makes it clear that this is the issue of our day.


What is democracy really? What do we mean when we use the term? And can it ever truly exist? 

There is no shortage of democracy, at least in name, and yet it is in crisis everywhere we look. From a cabal of thieving plutocrats in the White House to rising inequality and xenophobia worldwide, it is clear that democracy—specifically the principle of government by and for the people—is not living up to its promise.

In Democracy May Not Exist, but We'll Miss It When It's Gone, Astra Taylor shows that real democracy—fully inclusive and completely egalitarian—has in fact never existed. In a tone that is both philosophical and anecdotal, weaving together history, theory, the stories of individuals, and conversations with such leading thinkers as Cornel West, Danielle Allen, and Wendy Brown, Taylor invites us to reexamine the term. Is democracy a means or an end, a process or a set of desired outcomes? What if the those outcomes, whatever they may be—peace, prosperity, equality, liberty, an engaged citizenry—can be achieved by non-democratic means? Or if an election leads to a terrible outcome? If democracy means rule by the people, what does it mean to rule and who counts as the people?

The inherent paradoxes are too often unnamed and unrecognized. By teasing them out, Democracy May Not Exist, but We'll Miss It When It's Gone offers a better understanding of what is possible, what we want, and why democracy is so hard to realize.

The image of the anarchist assassin haunted the corridors of power and the popular imagination in the late nineteenth century. Fear spawned a gross but persistent stereotype: a swarthy "Italian" armed with a bloody knife or revolver and bred to violence by a combination of radical politics, madness, innate criminality, and poor genes. That Italian anarchists targeted--and even killed--high-profile figures added to their exaggerated, demonic image.

Nunzio Pernicone and Fraser M. Ottanelli dig into the transnational experiences and the historical, social, cultural, and political conditions behind the phenomenon of anarchist violence in Italy. Looking at political assassinations in the 1890s, they illuminate the public effort to equate anarchy's goals with violent overthrow. Throughout, Pernicone and Ottanelli combine a cutting-edge synthesis of the intellectual origins, milieu, and nature of Italian anarchist violence with vivid portraits of its major players and their still-misunderstood movement.

A bold challenge to conventional thinking, Assassins against the Old Order demolishes a century of myths surrounding anarchist violence and its practitioners.

@ Red Emma's

#Slaysian: LGBTQ+ Asian Americans Reclaiming Art is a discussion centering Queer identified AAPI Artist in the of Baltimore City. Gaysians fight to be represented, we fight to exist within our respective communities without being shunned and alienated because our existence is politicizes Asian-America, a group which was meant to be silenced and marginalized from participating in US society and politics. This event highlights how artists politically activate and express their identities through their work and inquires our delicate role of relative privilege and marginality within the context of a majority Black and White racial binary of Baltimore City.


@ Red Emma's

Baltimore's Shawna Potter, singer for the band War On Women, has tackled sexism and harassment in lyrics and on stage for years. Taking the battle to music venues themselves, she has trained night clubs and community spaces in how to create safer environments for marginalized people. Now she’s turned decades of experience into a clear and concise guide for public spaces of all sorts—from art galleries to bagel shops to concert halls—that want to shut down harassers wherever they show up. The steps she outlines are realistic, practical, and actionable. With the addition of personal stories, case studies, sample policies, and no-nonsense advice like “How to Flirt without Being a Creep,” she shows why safer spaces are important, while making it easier to achieve them. Punk passion, candor, and anger get the job done!


A masterful narrative—with echoes of Evicted and The Color of Law—that brings to life the structures, policies, and beliefs that divide us.

Mark Lange and Nicole Smith have never met, but if they make the moves they are contemplating—Mark, a white suburbanite, to West Baltimore, and Nicole, a black woman from a poor city neighborhood, to a prosperous suburb—it will defy the way the Baltimore region has been programmed for a century. It is one region, but separate worlds. And it was designed to be that way.

In this deeply reported, revelatory story, duPont Award–winning journalist Lawrence Lanahan chronicles how the region became so highly segregated and why its fault lines persist today. Mark and Nicole personify the enormous disparities in access to safe housing, educational opportunities, and decent jobs. As they eventually pack up their lives and change places, bold advocates and activists—in the courts and in the streets—struggle to figure out what it will take to save our cities and communities: Put money into poor, segregated neighborhoods? Make it possible for families to move into areas with more opportunity?

The Lines Between Us is a riveting narrative that compels reflection on America’s entrenched inequality—and on where the rubber meets the road not in the abstract, but in our own backyards. Taking readers from church sermons to community meetings to public hearings to protests to the Supreme Court to the death of Freddie Gray, Lanahan deftly exposes the intricacy of Baltimore’s hypersegregation through the stories of ordinary people living it, shaping it, and fighting it, day in and day out.

This eye-opening account of how a city creates its black and white places, its rich and poor spaces, reveals that these problems are not intractable; but they are designed to endure until each of us—despite living in separate worlds—understands we have something at stake.

@ Red Emma's
Stop by the bar at Red Emma's to enjoy alcoholic and non-alcoholic drink specials, make some new friends, try some delicious vegan eats, and relax on the patio!