events at red emma's

@ Red Emma's

with: 

Patricia Rodney & Jesse Benjamin (Walter Rodney Foundation)

Larry Jackson and Kali-Ahset Amen (Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts)

Lester Spence (JHU)  


@ Red Emma's

It’s a new decade, but old oppression lingers, old challenges still haunt us.  The need for the arts generally, and poetry specifically, is as great as ever!  Join us for an open mic of justice, conscious thought, spirituality, fam, real life—whatever advances the village!  In the tradition of Emma Goldman’s “Mother Earth” magazine, come drop some rad “fiyah” on us, or contribute just with your presence and energy.  Our theme is “Peace, Justice, Poetry!”  By the way: it’s a non-erotic venue, so rather than a love & erotica evening, we focus this night on justice and other matters of life.  And, almost needless to say, leave the misogyny, homophobia and other unnecessary ish outside!

Our feature, Roscoe Burnems (Douglas Powell), is an award winning spoken word artist and educator, born and raised in Richmond, VA. He is a National Poetry Slam champion, Underground Poetry Slam champion, two-time regional poetry slam team finalist, and multiple local grand slam champion.  Roscoe has published three recognized collections of poetry, has been published in a dozen literary magazines and journals over the years and has been a speaker for TedxYouth. When not competing or touring he conducts writing and performance workshops for schools and non-profits in RVA.

https://roscoeb.webs.com/

Holdin’ it down for the evening is Analysis—poet/spoken word artist, bookseller, educator, minister, justice & human rights theoretician… Y’all know what’s up! 

www.facebook.com/analysisthepoet
Twitter and Instagram: @analysisthepoet

www.artistEcard.com/analysisthepoet

The MIC LIST will open at 5:00PM. 

FREE ADMISSION!  [We will take a collection to support the feature.]

(Mature language and themes may be involved; not suggested for younger children.)


Remember: PEACE, JUSTICE, POETRY!!  Will we see you there?  :)

Join acclaimed filmmaker and novelist John Sayles as he presents his new novel, Yellow Earth, and talks about his work with Eric Allen Hatch of Beyond Video.

Blues legend B.B. King spent his life sharing the music of his soul, which shone relentlessly through hardship and triumph alike. He never wavered from his vocation, even as he gathered up other musicians in his wake and melded them into the harmony of his animating passion. In this intimate portrait of King, author Diane Williams offers a brief account of the monumental blues man’s life before settling in for a series of interviews with his bandmates and beloved family members, offering readers an invaluable opportunity to feel like they know King too.


@ Red Emma's

Against the backdrop of America’s escalating urban rebellions in the 1960s, an unexpected cohort of New York radicals unleashed a series of urban guerrilla actions against the city’s racist policies and contempt for the poor. Their dramatic flair, uncompromising vision, and skillful ability to link local problems to international crises riveted the media, alarmed New York’s political class, and challenged nationwide perceptions of civil rights and black power protest. The group called itself the Young Lords.

 

Utilizing oral histories, archival records, and an enormous cache of police records released only after a decade-long Freedom of Information Law request and subsequent court battle, Johanna Fernández has written the definitive account of the Young Lords, from their roots as a street gang to their rise and fall as a political organization. Led predominantly by poor and working-class Puerto Rican youth, and consciously fashioned after the Black Panther Party, the Young Lords confronted race and class inequality and questioned American foreign policy. Their imaginative, irreverent protests and media conscious tactics won significant reforms and exposed U.S. mainland audiences to the country’s quiet imperial project in Puerto Rico. In riveting style, Fernández demonstrates how the Young Lords redefined the character of protest, the color of politics, and the cadence of popular urban culture in the age of great dreams.


A major recasting of American history from the vantage of immigration politics


It is often said that with the election of Donald Trump nativism was raised from the dead. After all, here was a president who organized his campaign around a rhetoric of unvarnished racism and xenophobia. Among his first acts on taking office was to issue an executive order blocking Muslim immigrants from entering the United States. But although his actions may often seem unprecedented, they are not as unusual as many people believe. This story doesn’t begin with Trump. For decades, Republicans and Democrats alike have employed xenophobic ideas and policies, declaring time and again that “illegal immigration” is a threat to the nation’s security, wellbeing, and future.

The profound forces of all-American nativism have, in fact, been pushing politics so far to the right over the last forty years that, for many people, Trump began to look reasonable. As Daniel Denvir argues, issues as diverse as austerity economics, free trade, mass incarceration, the drug war, the contours of the post 9/11 security state, and, yes, Donald Trump and the Alt-Right movement are united by the ideology of nativism, which binds together assorted anxieties and concerns into a ruthless political project. 

All-American Nativism provides a powerful and impressively researched account of the long but often forgotten history that gave us Donald Trump.